Spring 2020 The Authors

The Dolls of Huguette Clark 

by Florence Theriault

Florence and her husband George Theriault opened a small country auction house in rural Pennsylvania 50 years ago. Within ten years that small auction company became an internationally renowned antique auction firm. Florence has authored more than 50 books on the subject of dolls and is the chief doll auction cataloger. She is considered one of the world's leading experts on the subject and has become an international figure in the world of dolls for her expertise and commitment to collectors, while also speaking in educational seminars around the US.

 

The Wedding Cake and its Cake Toppers 

by Rosemary Deal

Rosemary has been a doll collector since the 1960s and a member of the Battle Creek Area Doll Club since 1979. Her extensive collection includes all types of dolls, teddy bears and doll houses but antiques are her favorite. She has an extensive collection of Liberty of London dolls. She was in charge of the competition for the Region 12 convention held in Battle Creek in 1989. A retired elementary school teacher, she has attended many conventions over the years.

 

Traveling Trunks and Presentation Boxes 

by Rosemary Deal

Rosemary has been a doll collector since the 1960s and a member of the Battle Creek Area Doll Club since 1979. Her extensive collection includes all types of dolls, teddy bears and doll houses but antiques are her favorite. She has an extensive collection of Liberty of London dolls. She was in charge of the competition for the Region 12 convention held in Battle Creek in 1989. A retired elementary school teacher, she has attended many conventions over the years.

 

Dressed for Success: Steiff's Remarkable Turn of Last Century "Green" Circus Doll 

by Rebekah Kaufman

Rebekah Kaufman is a third generation, lifelong Steiff enthusiast. Her collection of Steiff items numbers beyond 1,000 and focuses on examples from 1905 onward, including uncataloged rarities and Studio (life-sized) items. Professionally, she is the archivist for Steiff North America, where she leads collector's events, assists with product development initiatives, participates in special projects, and identifies and values vintage Steiff treasures on behalf of the company. She also works for Morphy Auctions of Denver, Pennsylvania, as the Steiff specialist in the Doll and Toy Division and as the company's public relations specialist.

Rebekah is a regular contributor to many publications, including Doll News, Antique Doll Collector, Teddy Bear and Friends, and the Steiff Club Magazine, which has a circulation of over 30,000 and is translated into five languages. Her blog, My SteiffLife, (http://mysteifflife.blogspot.com/) receives thousands of visits per month and focuses on interesting vintage Steiff items, Steiff antiquing adventures, and the history behind older Steiff treasures. Her Steiff book for children, Sassafrass Jones and Her Forever Friends ABCs is available through <Amazon.com>.

Rebekah is the admin on the vintage Steiff Facebook fan page, where she has grown the fan base from 400 to almost 10,000. She is frequently tapped by auction houses and the media for her Steiff expertise; recent engagements include Christie's of London, Teddy Dorado, Theriault's, James D. Julia, FAO Schwarz, The Boston Globe, Bloomberg, The Huffington Post, Town and Country, Harry Rinker's "Whatcha Got," Antique Auction Forum, Gemr, The Collectors Show, MfG-Film (Germany) and the television programs: Inside Edition, Pawn Stars, and Clean House.

 

Hard to Find Madame Alexander Dolls Part 2 

by Jane Foster

Jane Foster was an elementary teacher for 38 years. She then enjoyed teaching reading on a part-time basis at the elementary level for five years. She is a member of Randolph Street Baptist Church and the Kanawha Valley Doll Club. Effanbee Patsy dolls, Shirley Temple dolls and memorabilia, and Nancy Ann Style Show dolls comprise most of her collection. Dolls from the decade of the 1950s are of special interest to Jane. She has lived in Hurricane, West Virginia all her life, currently residing there with her husband. Jane has written articles for Antique Doll Collector, DOLL NEWS and Doll Collector (formerly Contemporary Doll) magazines. Recently Jane had her second children's book published entitled "Dime Store Dolls," which is featured in fall's issue in Reviewing Resources.

 

Vogue Doll Company's International Brides of 1982 

by Jackie Childers

I grew up loving dolls, but I was unaware that there were such things as doll shops. I knew about Terri Lee and her wardrobe from magazine ads, but Alexanders and Ginny? The Sears Catalog was my main source of dolly dreams, but somehow, I also discovered Kimport. And of course, there were the Hollywood-type dolls from the grocery store. I even had a mirror-backed, glass-shelved, wall-hung doll cabinet made by my dad.

I went off to nursing school, to marriage, motherhood, and the life of a military spouse in the Vietnam era. I attended my first doll show in 1970 in Lincoln Nebraska, then discovered eBay and learned of UFDC in their now-defunct chat room. I have been a UFDC member since the late 90's, and at one time belonged to three clubs, serving as secretary for two, simultaneously.

My husband of nearly 55 years is the photographer for this article. He has favorites among my dolls, including Tonner, Dianna Effner, and Dewees Cochran. Our son tolerates dolls, as his wife also is a UFDC member, and our daughter has acquired a few dolls along with four adult children, two daughters-in-law, and four grandkids.

Over the years, I have been a nurse, a Girl Scout leader, choral singer, writer for several publications including the Baltimore Sun, and a cloth doll maker among other things. My husband and I also collect lighthouse miniatures and prints, and artisan pottery from the village of Mata Ortiz, Chihuahua, Mexico.

 

Patterns: Sewing Those Bridal Outfits and Trousseaus 

by Linda Holderbaum

Linda is the new editor of DOLL NEWS. She has been collecting dolls since the 1960s. While ethnic dolls have always been her first love, her collection includes antique to modern and everything in between. She is currently the Executive Director of the Art Center of Battle Creek with extensive museum collection background. She was the chairperson of the 1989 UFDC Region 12 Conference in Battle Creek. She was a judge for the Timbertown Dollology Club's annual competition for ten years and for the Fort Wayne Doll Club's annual competition for fifteen years. Linda also writes for Antique Doll Collector's Magazine.

 

Brides Around the World 

by Linda Holderbaum

Linda is the new editor of DOLL NEWS. She has been collecting dolls since the 1960s. While ethnic dolls have always been her first love, her collection includes antique to modern and everything in between. She is currently the Executive Director of the Art Center of Battle Creek with extensive museum collection background. She was the chairperson of the 1989 UFDC Region 12 Conference in Battle Creek. She was a judge for the Timbertown Dollology Club's annual competition for ten years and for the Fort Wayne Doll Club's annual competition for fifteen years. Linda also writes for Antique Doll Collector's Magazine.

 

Noel and Carolyn Schoenhut Bride and Flower Girl 

by Victoria Christopherson

Victoria belongs to three doll clubs in Region 11. She is past president and current vice-president of the Chesapeake Doll Club of Maryland. Her interests in dolls and art date back to her childhood when she was encouraged by her mother to develop her talents. She created her first paper doll at the age of twelve and is currently a member of the Original Paper Doll Artists Guild. Her paper dolls have appeared in DOLL NEWS and other national magazines.

Carving wooden dolls is a passion for Victoria. Mainly using bass wood and mahogany, her one-of-a-kind dolls are frequent blue-ribbon winners in UFDC competitive exhibits. Victoria teaches workshops for doll clothing, shoes and accessories, as well as ornaments made from her paper dolls with fabric and trims. A graduate of the University of Pittsburg, Victoria enjoys working in watercolor and watercolor with pen and ink. Her watercolors have been displayed in shows in Baltimore and other locations. She belongs to a local watercolor group and teaches a class for watercolor techniques.

 

Stepping Out in Style 

by Kari Gluski

Kari Gluski is a member of Ann Arbor Doll Collectors, where she is currently Secretary and has served in the past as President. She has a Ph.D. in history and an M.S. in computer science from the University of Michigan, where she worked as an application developer (computer programmer) until retiring a few years ago.

She began her adult collecting by finding a bag of 8-inch vintage Betsy McCall clothing in a consignment shop and recognizing a few pieces from her own childhood dolls. Since Betsy clothing is untagged, she embarked on a mission to build a website with photos of as many verified outfits as she could find and get permission to use, so other people could identify the garments as well. That research led to discovery of the Tonner Doll Company reproduction Betsy McCall. Tonner dolls of all types became her favorite.

She remains an avid thrift shopper and adopts dolls of all eras. Every sad doll found tends to mean she pays a pittance for the doll and then ten times that for a book to research and restore it. 

She sews for her dolls and her adult daughter and enjoys finding and making accurate historical costumes for them. That interest led to the creation of the DVD, Modern Dolls in Historical Costume to 1899, which won UFDC's 2019 audio-visual prize.

 

It's All Her Fault! 

by Susan Hedrick

The dolls who have gone to live with Susan Hedrick say that she's been collecting for most of her adult life and her collection is notoriously eclectic. They boast proudly that life with her has been mostly exciting, as she once was curator for the Rosalie Whyel Museum of Doll Art for many years.

Susan's dolls say she is retired now but spends time on the Collections Oversight Committee of UFDC's own doll museum in Kansas City where she now resides. She also serves on the staff of DOLL NEWS Magazine. Hardly enough to keep her busy, the dolls say she haunts thrift stores and the occasional estate sale for finds. She also acts as an appraiser of antiques and the like. Susan is currently a member of the Heirloom Doll Collectors Club of Greater Kansas City.

 

An Accidental Bride Doll 

by Patricia Dutchman

Pat was born on March 26, 1951 in Chardon, OH at Corey Hospital. She was educated at Colegio Intl de Carabobo, Venezuela; Colegio Franklin Roosevelt, Peru; Asociacion Escuelas Lincoln, Argentina; Dearborn HS, MI; Mayfield HS, OH; and Kent State University, OH.

She has worked at Design/Drafting/CAD positions at Novelty Lighting Corp, Bedford; Johnson Rubber Co, Middlefield; Cleveland Range, Euclid; Goodrich Power Systems, and Twinsburg; Mantaline Rubber Co, Mantua.

Her hobbies include gardening, reading, movies, cooking, water aerobics, traveling, doll collecting, and she previously created porcelain dolls. Her current favorite doll is her Travel Doll Sophie by Robert Tonner and she collects antique French and German Bisque Head Fashion and Child dolls, Composition, Gene Marshall, Ellowyne and other modern fashion dolls, celluloids, brides, and cloth dolls. Her earliest doll-related memory is playing dolls and washing doll clothing with her best friend Rhonda on her back porch when she was 5 years old.

Pat joined UFDC in 1986 when she was 35 years old. She was influenced by her mother-in-law and sister-in-law, both named Patricia Dutchman and both avid doll collectors. She joined Cleveland Doll Club in 2004 and had held positions of President, Vice President, Corresponding Secretary, Membership, Webmaster, and Luncheon Chair. She also belongs Northern Ohio Doll Club, Beachwood, OH and has belonged to several other doll clubs including Dollaholics of SW Indiana, Evansville, IN (disbanded) and Heart of Doll Country, Garrettsville, OH, (disbanded).

With the Cleveland Doll Club has organized bus trips to Washington D.C., Chicago and to doll shows. She attends many doll luncheons and shows and Tonner and WI Conventions. Pat has attended 10 UFDC National Conventions and 3 Regional Conventions.

The youngest of five siblings, Pat is married to her husband Bill dutchman and they have two children Mandy (Travis) and James (Sarah) and grandkids Grace, Luke, Olivia and Ben.

 

Madame Alexander's Judy 

by Woolsey Ackerman

Woolsey Ackerman has been influenced by the world of dolls and movies since he was a kid. When his mother inherited her grandmother's collection of dolls that had been acquired while living in Europe in the 1920s the collector bug bit. The family had run an opera house and movie theatre between 1890 and the late 1950s and Woolsey grew up with stories of the old movies and days of touring vaudeville. Discovering at an early age that dolls and toys had been an integral part of the merchandising and publicity of movies since films beginning, he saw a unique way to combine his passions. He has pursued this since, making the history of the movies his lifelong career. Susan, his mother, along with father, Richard, continue the main collection to this day.

As a kid Woolsey saved his money from paper routes and playing church organ to start the movie division of the collection. Billie Nelson Tyrell helped out with her then mail-order business of the best old movie dolls out there! Over the past 30 years some of the finest and most rare of the genre have become a part of the collection. Though sometimes difficult to retain, the collection with its many personalities and characters (including variations and artist creations of those celebrated persons) has been kept intact, telling the history of movie merchandising between 1913 and 1970.

Ackerman came to Los Angeles right out of college and was able to get in on the ground floor when interest in the preservation of film history started. First working for the Director's Guild of America, he got his feet wet in Hollywood and met some of the movies most influential directors. That led to a job at Ted Turner's new company when Ted acquired the great MGM, Warner Brothers, RKO film library. There he became researcher and archivist for the publishing division which produced coffee table books on the movies, including the award winning WHEN THE LION ROARS. That lead to a documentary and then a whole new career working on all aspects of research and production for Turner Classic Movies, producing documentaries, DVD presentations, books , music CDs and the interstitial presentations which the network continues to broadcast to this day. It meant meeting and working with all the legends of old Hollywood too, including some of those personalities represented in the collection of dolls including Shirley Temple, Margaret O'Brien, Jane Withers, Lauren Bacall, Shari Lewis, Sybil Jason, Jackie Cooper, Baby Peggy, and Susan Dey. A stint with fellow collector Barbra Streisand archiving and cataloging her collection of career memorabilia for auction followed along with work in various aspects of film memorabilia, film archiving and film making.

In his various travels in the close-knit Hollywood group of historians he met celebrity photographer Stephen Paley who is working on a photo book of interesting and unique Hollywood characters. He felt that Woolsey and the collection could be an image he might feature in such a project, and thus a panoramic display photo came to be. This photo lead to "America Now" producer and writer Jeff Copeland deciding to do a series of segments for the news show about movie related dolls, the first airing in Oct. 2013. That segment showed the scope of the collection and focused on Shirley Temple and Judy Garland dolls. A future segment will feature a rare Rudolph Valentino doll. These can be viewed today on YouTube.

During the past several years, he has worked closely with Theriault's and the Shirley Temple Black family. First in assisting in the cataloging of her career memorabilia collection that was presented in the LOVE, SHIRLEY TEMPLE touring exhibit, catalog and auction; then in the presentation of several museum exhibitions honoring Temple and utilizing his collection and those of others. This work continues.

He has also served as a go to person in research for the movie related dolls designed by R. John Wright and Robert Tonner.

Woolsey feels that the art of doll collecting should be presented to the general public to promote an understanding and interest in it. Most everyone can relate to the movie genre. Many of us owned a representation of one of our favorite movie characters as a kid. Woolsey plans to continue sharing information about the collection through articles, books, TV shows, exhibits and hopes that one day this genre of doll will be a part of a movie related museum.

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